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L’Ile d’Orléans

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Judith Crawley

Frank Radford Crawley

Description:

"In L'Ile d'Orléans, Radford and Judith Crawley cross a bridge and come back. But they cross a bridge with a difference, because what they see and what they make us see on the other side of that bridge is the inner essence of a withdrawn people, who proudly conserve the memory of things past in the realities of things here. The Maxim Award winner opens a door into a region of Eastern Canada — the Island of Orleans — where old French and old Canadian folkways are lived placidly and with dignity. Actually, the camera crosses a very modern bridge at the film's beginning and returns over it at its end. But, once in L'Ile d'Orléans, in the hands of the two Crawleys, this Twentieth Century box of wheels and gears spins a tale of yesterday, even if it pictures just what its lens sees today. The landscape and the old houses, some of them there for more than two hundred years, set the decor, after which we come to the dwellers in this separate Arcady. They do, with a delightful unconsciousness of being observed, the things that make up their daily lives, and, when invited to take notice of the visitors, they do this with a fine courtesy that is the very refinement of hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. Crawley devote a liberal part of their footage to a careful study of home cheese making, in which camera positions and a large number of close shots turn what might have been a dull and factual record into something of cinematographic distinction. The highlight of the Crawleys' film is a leisurely and sympathetic watching of what is the highlight of life in l'Ile d'Orléans — the country Sunday. We see different churches, all of a general type, but each with its essential neighborhood individuality. Finally, one of these is singled out for an extensive camera visit. Bells ring and the country priest is shown with his gravity and solemn courtesy. The countryside comes to life with its church bound inhabitants who wind over the simple roads slowly yet purposefully and with the assurance of those who know that the land is theirs as it was their fathers'. With such pictures of everyday life, scored with appropriate music for double turntable showing, Mr. and Mrs. Crawley have etched an epoch, in a record which can stand on its own feet with good genre description in any art form. With not a single concession to sentimentality — as should be the case in honest work — but with a sure feeling for that which reaches out for the finer emotions, they have shown us what they found across the bridge. Here is personal filming at its best." Movie Makers, Dec. 1939, 608-609.


Little Place in the Country, A

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

Charles Woodley

Description:

"Film about the Woodley’s at their place in the country." Library and Archives Canada.


Maple Sugar Bush

Date produced: 1955

Filmmaker(s):

Charles Woodley

Description:

"Shows children at a sugar bush in Ontario in springtime." Library and Archives Canada.


Milk, Its Production and Pasteurization

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

A. C. Baxter

Description:

"To make clear the entire course of sanitary milk production, from pasture to home table, the State of Illinois Department of Public Health, in Springfield, Ill., is using a two reel, 16mm. film entitled Milk, Its Production and Pasteurization. Produced by Dr. A. C. Baxter, ACL, assistant director of public health, the film presents in interesting and informative sequences the modern technique of dairy farming and the relation of the department to it." Movie Makers, June 1934, 262.


Milkman, Our Community Helper, The

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Eugene Herrington


Moccasin, The

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Monroe Killy

Description:

"This film shows Ojibwe women at Squaw Point, Leech Lake tanning hides and making moccasins decorated with beadwork and an Arikara or Hidatsa woman at Fort Berthold, North Dakota tanning cow hide and doing quillwork on clothing." Minnesota Historical Society.


Nation Builders

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

James A. Sherlock

Description:

"The subject of 'Nation Builders'—the history of Australia—is without doubt the most ambitious ever undertaken by any amateur filmer. The fact that the project was successful is in itself a tribute to Sherlock's skill. Granted that in connection with the 150th anniversary of his nation's founding there were pageants re-enacting historic events and an opportunity for an alter filmster to photograph them: but how many times have not other amateurs scored dismal failures trying the same thing? Filming such a pageant, it is all too easy to capture only the impression of history actually happening. The twentieth century background which must so often have been just beyond the camera-lines was never permitted to intrude upon his eighteenth and nineteenth century action." American Cinematographer, Feb. 1939, 61.


Navajo Seasons

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Wide Ruins and area, farming Navajos, Black Rock - Medicine Man, Cut Hair plowing, Joe Toddy following Cut Hair, planting, Patsy Martin standing on Cultivator, Jim House's wife husking corn, Paul Jones helping husk corn, sheep dipping at Ganado, Dwight Wagner viewing sheep dipping, wool shearing at Wide Ruins, loading sheep at Chambers, tall man in tan outfit Bill Cousins, Bent Knee sitting on fence, Crip Chee's grandson in closing scene'." New Mexico States Archives.


Navajo Weaving I

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Part one of Navajo Weaving. Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Crip Chee's Hogan, Milton Davis holding lamb, Eleanor Johnson from Hawaii, Bill Lippincott, Grandstaff (center), Hosteen Glish - purchase of rams for up-breeding, shearing at Wide Ruins, Jim House on horseback, Joe Toddy taking wool out for sorting and sacking for shipment, dipping in chute, Walter Ashley putting sheep in dip, Little Shorty to left, washing the wool before spinning, Patsy Martin sorting, Sybil Shorty carding wool, Dorothy Lippincott Stockton trying to learn, Louise Dale spinning wool, washing of yarn, gathering plants for dyes, Little Woman (Captive of Kit Carson - survived the Long March) grey-haired woman - stripping bark from Juniper root for red dye'." New Mexico States Archives.


Navajo Weaving II

Date produced:

Filmmaker(s):

Sallie Wagner

Description:

"Part two of Navajo Weaving. Un-staged documentary footage shot and edited by Sallie Wagner. Sallie's description of the film: 'Rose Martin, Patsy Martin warping, Sybil Shorty weaving, looms built by the Lippincotts at the Wide Ruins Indian School, Madge Clark, Dan Gaddy, and John Joe in front of the trading post, Bill Lippincott in patio with rug display, Bill Cousins selling rug to tourist'." New Mexico State Archives.


Total Pages: 7