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Bulbs and Beauty

Date produced: 1952

Filmmaker(s):

Haven Trecker

Description:

"Bulbs and Beauty reveals in painstaking detail the planting, cultivating and harvesting of gladioli in the vast fields surrounding the town of Momence in the state of Illinois. In this elaborate undertaking, Haven Trecker unfolds in well planned and profusely close-upped sequences the many colorful aspects of this popular plant in the life of flower-loving America. The harvesting sequence is followed by somewhat generous footage of a flower festival, the big annual affair in glad-minded Momence; and the festival in turn is followed by a seemingly endless parade in tribute to these bounteous blossoms. Bulbs and Beauty, accompanied agreeably by magnetic sound on film, appears to have been made for informative and record purposes. It fulfills these functions in a lively and competent manner." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 337, 339.


By Sea To Florida

Date produced: 1931

Filmmaker(s):

Porter Varney

Description:

"By Sea To Florida, 400 ft., 16mm., made by Porter Varney of Bradenton, Fla., is a film record of a sea trip which derives its importance from the fact that the photography and choice of viewpoint are consistently exceptional. Parts of the ship, such as the rigging and cordage, the portholes, the lifeboat davits, etc., were used with rare artistry as aids to composition and effect. An expert use of filters produced exceptionally pleasing and truthful black and white rendition of the sea and the movement and sway of the ship. Continuity was effectually obtained by a shifting of the camera viewpoint, emphasizing the harbor, the high seas and the arrival in Florida. A startling climax to the film was given by a series of shots of an approaching hurricane captured by Mr. Varney 's intrepid camera." Movie Makers, Dec. 1931, 685.


Caineville

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

Glen H. Turner

Description:

"In Caineville, Glen H. Turner has now turned his camera on a Western ghost town, and with moments of sheer movie magic, he has brought it to life again. The slow turning by the wind of the leaves of an abandoned school book, and the slow pan to initials carved on a schoolhouse desk, evoke as if he were alive the youngster who carved them. In another scene, done with consummate smoothness, Mr. Turner shows an abandoned street on which a schoolboy, with books over his shoulder, slowly materializes into solid form — and then dissolves again into thin air. Surrounding Caineville always are the brooding mountains and the ever-encroaching river which implacably seeks to destroy the last vestiges of the crumbling village. Caineville is a triumph of imaginative creation over static material." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 320.


Campus Smiles

Date produced: 1920

Filmmaker(s):

Henry Royce

Fordyce Tuttle

Description:

"Campus Smiles uses a playful tone to document the faculty, student body, and life at UW-Madison during the early 1920s. This documentary short is a compelling chronicle of the local culture at one of the nation’s largest universities and offers a glimpse into the undergraduate sphere of the immediate post-WWI era. In it, humorous intertitles penned in early twentieth-century American slang introduce campus personalities and comment on social events." Archive.org


Canyons Unlimited

Date produced: 1962

Filmmaker(s):

Peter B. Delaurenti

Description:

"Down the Colorado River from Hite to the junction of the San Juan River in Colorado, via a power boat. This is a camping, sightseeing adventure in the deep canyons of the river. We are acquainted with the preparations for this trip Along the scenic canyon way of picturesque land and rock formations we stop to search out some of the birds, lizards, flora, and other life of interest to the nature lover. The placid and rugged beauty of this area contains some of the old Indian caves. From one of the campsites we go by foot to the famous Rainbow Bridge, a natural arch span of more than 300 feet. Canyons unlimited is an inspiration to those who love adventure" PSA Journal, Oct. 1962, 34.


Carabi Incident, The

Date produced: 1951

Filmmaker(s):

Harry W. Atwood

Description:

"Once again Harry W. Atwood has used the desert locales of the Southwest and his mastery of outdoor color filming to mount a dramatic and exciting action picture. Although The Carabi Incident is truly an incident rather than a full-fledged photoplay, it does manage to include an abandoned mine, a lost prospector, a worried young girl and her companion — and both a happy and a tragic ending! The production is enriched with Mr. Atwood's usually fine selection of camera angles and suspenseful editing. For these reviewers, however, an excess of dialog subtitles was a drag on the film's development." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 341.


Carolina Holiday

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Henry K. Burns

Description:

"If the lead title — Carolina Holiday — promises run-of-the-mill vacation footage, there is surely nothing else routine about this production. It is, rather, a rhapsody of color and a tone poem of contrasting moods, to which Henry K. Burns, jr., has brought fine technical skill and a perceptive eye for composition. Although rich in scenic beauty, his views are never static, for movement in a score of things — drifting fog, rustling leaves, an unexpected snow flurry — introduce animation unlooked for in the subject. An unfortunate commentary and hapless scoring (save toward the end) were detrimental to the film's achieving higher honors." Movie Makers, Dec. 1950, 466-467.


Cavalcade of America

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Harley H. Bixler

Description:

"Harley H. Bixler, a technician, has been inspired with the might of America, and he has interpreted it according to his lights. In Cavalcade of America, taking our entire country as his canvas, he has painted in, with striking chromatic images, the physical and industrial high lights of our heritage. Here are the sinews of strength, awaiting only the activating force of human endeavor to turn them to the path of power. Here are the mills and the mines, the oil and the electricity, the farms and the factories without equal in our modern world. Mr. Bixler interprets his fine pictorial document with a narrative that is usually vivid but sometimes matter of fact and accompanies the whole with recorded music. Cavalcade of America is a striking study of a tremendous subject." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 602.


Celle Qui Fait la Peinture

Date produced: 1963

Filmmaker(s):

James L. Watson

Description:

""That Which Makes the Picture" introduces its audience to the art of painting. Using a charming New England harbor scene, the viewer is shown the beginning sketches, the application of the basic colors, and the finishing touches to completion. After viewing the film, one has a greater appreciation for the care and attention to detail required of the artist working in oil paints" PSA Journal, Oct. 1963, 41.


Century of Progress

Date produced: 1933

Filmmaker(s):

Herbert H. Johnson

Description:

"Among the ten best, Century of Progress, in Kodacolor, by Herbert H. Johnson, ACL, is a striking illustration of the degree of perfection that color motion picture photography has attained. Its studied angles and dignified composition are augmented by excellent photography. Mr. Johnson paid careful attention to the very important point of exact exposure in relation to color value and, as a result, brought a new version of the Fair to the one who had never seen it in color before. By taking plenty of time he was able to single out the best camera positions and wait for the lighting that was most favorable. The excellent handling of the camera brought a sense of intimacy to each scene. The film's only fault is an excessive use of lap dissolves which detracted somewhat from the smoothness of the continuity." Movie Makers, Dec. 1933, 499.


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