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Decomposition and Extraction of a Breech

Date produced: 1943

Filmmaker(s):

Robert Mallory

Description:

"Dr. Robert Mallory, III, offers another of his brilliant surgical movies. This very able filmer, who has brought his hobby to the service of his profession, studies the course of a childbirth in which grave complications are found. The operation is recorded very intelligently, and to the enforced continuity that the event itself makes necessary are brought closeups and varying camera positions, wherever these are possible. The value of this type of cinematography to surgeons who work alone in small communities is incalculable. When it exists at all, it is highly serviceable; when it is as well done as Dr. Mallory has done it, it is a very direct contribution to the art of healing. Dr. Mallory, in this film, makes a very clarifying use of a model, to show the misplacement of the child and some of the delivery technique, thus giving information that the camera could not otherwise have presented." Movie Makers, Dec. 1943, 477.


Deed to Happiness

Date produced: 1949

Description:

"Cincinnati Movie Club is producing a motion picture glamorizing the nursing profession. Had it been done for the hospitals by commercial professionals, the production would have cost more than $25,000. The film, 'Deed To Happiness,' is designed to promote interest in nursing among high school girls and alleviate the shortage of nurses in hospitals of Greater Cincinnati and Southwestern Ohio. Prints of the full color motion picture, with narration by Howard Chamberlain of VLW, are to be sold at cost to Cincinnati hospitals and screened in high schools." The Cincinnati Inquirer, May 22, 1949, 95.


Forgotten Frontier, The

Date produced: 1930

Filmmaker(s):

Marvin Breckinridge

Description:

"The Forgotten Frontier, filmed by Miss Marvin Breckinridge, is the most ambitious amateur made welfare film yet recorded. To show the operation of the Kentucky Nursing Service, Miss Breckinridge spent several months filming in the mountain districts reached by that organization. With the cooperation of the mountain folk, she staged several short dramas, each demonstrating the usefulness of one of the centers or some phase of their work. The completed picture runs 6000 ft., 35mm., and, in spite of the numerous technical difficulties, it is excellently photographed." Movie Makers, Dec. 1930, 788.


Hands that Work in the Darkness

Date produced: 1940

Filmmaker(s):

Jack L. Krapp

Description:

"It is a striking gesture to employ the one medium which depends upon the sense of sight to aid the cause of the blind. This is what Jack L. Krapp has done in his comprehensive movie, Hands that Work in the Darkness, a thoroughgoing presentation of the unusual work being done for the sightless by the Cleveland Society for the Blind. The film is of generous length, yet, because of Mr. Krapp's special skill in maintaining interest through choice of viewpoint and because of the absorbing subject matter, it holds the attention throughout. Appropriate musical background, together with the delivery of a well composed spoken narrative, further enhances the presentation of the subject. Mr. Krapp's interior lighting work is very well done, and he seems to be able to take large or small interiors in his stride. A notable section of the film includes the recording of a play, performed by blind actors on a full sized stage. This is an excellent record film and a splendid achievement in its field." Movie Makers, Dec. 1940, 602.


How an African Tribe Is Ruled Under Colonial Government

Date produced: 1939

Filmmaker(s):

Ray L. Garner

Virginia Garner

Description:

"Contrasts life in Belgian Congo under Belgian colonial government to that of tribal rule." National Archives.


If You Have Diabetes

Date produced: 1964

Description:

"The MPD Community Service Award sponsored by Norris Harkness, Hon. PSA, FPSA, was won by the 8-16 Cine Club of Detroit, Mich., in recognition of outstanding efforts in producing an instructional film on diabetes for the Michigan Diabetic Association. Titled If You Have Diabetes, this 700-foot 16mm production is designed to aid persons who have recently discovered that they have diabetes, in learning to keep the disease under control. The project was initiated by an 8-16 Club member who is a diabetic. The script was written by another club member with technical assistance provided by physicians on the staff of a major Detroit hospital. All photography, acting, editing, etc., was done by club members" PSA Journal, Sept. 1964, 51.


Keratoplasty

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Henry M. Lester

Description:

"Keratoplasty, by Henry M. Lester, ACL, is a beautifully perfect record of the operation of a corneal transplant for leucomateous eyes, filmed entirely in Kodachrome. The operation is performed by Dr. Ramon Castroviejo, a rabbit being the subject. Aside from the fact that this clearly executed film records an important and extraordinarily difficult operation in this field, it is notable for its brilliant photographic technique in handling the ultra closeup. In much of the footage, the eye itself practically fills the frame and, in this limited field of action, Mr. Lester has successfully shown every delicate bit of operative technique that is involved in this extremely sensitive surgical procedure. The area is so lighted that no shadows are cast to obscure detail, and the amazing rendition' of the delicate bit of transplanted tissue, the suturing and the various solutions employed, all in full color, is a genuine tribute to Mr. Lester's mastery of the Kodachrome process." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 550.


Little Rays of Sunshine

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

Douglas Flintoff

Description:

"Fundraising film about Queen Alexandra Solarium for Crippled Children at Mill Bay, near Victoria." (Duffy, Camera West)


Model Anesthesiologist, The

Date produced: 1966

Filmmaker(s):

Wallace M. Shaw

Description:

"The Model Anesthesiologist is a clam bake purely for fun by a group of the medical brotherhood who are having a sort of jam session in their own way with their own tools, and they are willing to let the camera record it all for posterity. They sing, they clown, and they poke holes in the back of some poor victim as they burlesque their workaday world" PSA Journal, Sept. 1966, 34.


Moulage For Masks

Date produced: 1937

Filmmaker(s):

James E. Bliss

Description:

"In Moulage For Masks, filmed for Dr. G. A. Peterson, Dr. James E. Bliss presents with satisfying clarity a step by step study of the procedure of producing the facial masks used to guide the operator in making dental restorations. A logical and carefully prepared script, added to finished camera work and exact editing, has created a color picture that gives an amazing amount of information in brief footage. It is a classroom film of notable competence, both because of the logicality of the cinematic thinking that it represents and because of the successful manner in which it always focuses audience attention on significant action. Carefully written titles integrate perfectly with the sequences, and the whole forms as compact a study as could be produced on this subject. At the same time, an eye for color composition and human interest has made the reel attractive from the layman's point of view." Movie Makers, Dec. 1937, 627.

"Good classroom film describing a method for the construction of facial casts by the use of a rubber like 'Moulage' for the impression. The photographic quality of the film is so good and the subject matter so interesting that the film is far above average. The color of course adds to its attractiveness. Film follows the instructor through the procedure of making a mask." Educational Film Catalog, 1939, 227.


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