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Festival Michigan

Date produced: 1953

Filmmaker(s):

Cornelius Vanden Broek

Description:

"In Festival Michigan, Cornelius Vanden Broek undertook to record all of the fairs and community festivals that occur in the State of Michigan throughout the year. He was prompted to make this record for the benefit of many friends who were not able to attend them and thus to provide them with a vicarious participation. The usual parades, crowning a queen of this or that, live stock, home preserves, midway attractions and various contests for young folks are all here, done with pleasantly brief sequencing. A lively commentary accompanies the film. On the whole, this rather formidable undertaking results in a pleasant and completely honest endeavor. Mr. Vanden Broek achieved his goal with fine spirit." Movie Makers, Dec. 1953, 334.


First Date

Date produced: 1949

Filmmaker(s):

John C. Sherard

Description:

"The trials, tribulations and eventual triumphs of a teen aged young man embarked on his initial evening engagement are engagingly portrayed by John C. Sherard in First Date. Even the traditional nuisance role played by junior members of the girl's family is given a new angle — a trained flea circus on the loose. But this bit of business and others in a basically imaginative comedy are, on occasion, drawn out too much for the best dramatic pace. Outstanding in the film, however, is Mr. Sherard's use of Type A Kodachrome outdoors without the corrective filter to simulate moonlight." Movie Makers, Dec. 1949, 469.


Fishers of Grande Anse

Date produced: 1935

Filmmaker(s):

Leslie P. Thatcher

Description:

"In Fishers of Grande Anse, Leslie P. Thatcher, ACL, has compiled a vivid and crystal clear cinematic document of cod fishing in a little village in northern New Brunswick. This picture is a restrained work of art that depicts the austere beauty of toil. Repairing boats and nets, catching and cleaning the cod, salting and storing the fish for market and the fishermen leaving for home are the raw material from which this black and white production draws its rugged and satisfying beauty. Close shots and closeups (never affected or forced) comprise the simple devices whereby the irrelevant and possibly distracting material is excluded and whereby the magnificent compositions are achieved. The technical quality of the picture is superb, but probably Mr. Thatcher's greatest accomplishment is in his choice of camera viewpoint." Movie Makers, Dec. 1935, 550.


Five Days From Home

Date produced: 1948

Filmmaker(s):

Mannie Lovitch

Description:

"A schoolboy in need of material for a geography theme launches Five Days From Home, as Dad gets out the movie projector and shows Son the cine harvest of his summer holiday. Among the points covered in a whirlwind auto trip from New York to Canada are Quebec City, Montmorency Falls, a Canadian pulpwood mill and Ausable Chasm, in New York State. Mannie Lovitch's handling of these subjects is always competent, occasionally excellent. His inquiring camera found many scenes of quaint charm in the old St. Lawrence city, and his full scale visual treatment of the pulp mill is sustained in interest by a superb bit of scoring with modern music by Virgil Thompson. Of especial note is Mr. Lovitch's mobile cross-cutting of the three to four themes which make up his coverage of the usually difficult Ausable Chasm." Movie Makers, Dec. 1948, 493.


France and Spain

Date produced: 1954

Filmmaker(s):

A. I. Willinsky

Description:

"Item is a film of a trip to Spain taken by Dr. Willinsky, his wife, Sadie, and some of their friends. Despite its title, the film does not contain footage of France. In the form of a travelogue, footage of landmarks, the local population, and the Willinsky's activities are accompanied by music and Dr. Willinsky's commentary. Footage includes shots of the Square of Spain, Sadie walking along the streets of a shopping district, churches and monasteries, a boat cruise from Palma to Figuera, a spring festival procession and dancing in Majorca. Most of the scenes were taken in Palma and Majorca." Ontario Jewish Archives.


Galleon Gold

Date produced: 1930

Filmmaker(s):

John C. Waterhouse

Description:

"Galleon Gold, 1600 ft., 16 mm., produced by the San Jose Players under the leadership of John C. Waterhouse, strikes a more sober note. This entertaining drama of the youth of a venerable Spanish family, who discover the treasure trove of the Conquistadores in time to save the family hacienda from the encroachment of the lime quarries, contains much good photography, a smooth continuity, experienced acting and first rate direction." Movie Makers, Sept. 1930, 569.

"Galleon Gold, 1600 ft., 16mm., produced by the San Jose Players, deserves special mention for its smooth flowing continuity alone. Although the difficulty of securing a lucid continuity is greatly increased in a longer dramatic picture, the producers of this film have achieved perfect clarity. This film was made during a summer vacation at a mountain ranch and it seemed at first that the lack of electric current for lighting would be an insuperable obstacle since the script called for many interior scenes. The problem was finally solved by a portable motor generator driven by a gas engine which, with proper lighting equipment, made ample illumination possible." Movie Makers, Dec. 1930, 788.


Gateway to Faith

Date produced: 1947

Filmmaker(s):

Paul J. Hayes

Edward J. Hayes

Description:

"The pitfalls of sentimentality and bombast have both been avoided in Gateway to Faith, a simple, dignified teaching film of the Roman Catholic baptismal rites, produced by the Reverend Edward Hayes and the Reverend Paul Hayes. With a clarity reminiscent of Thomistic syllogisms, the two priests show precisely what happens during a baptism and explain, with equal precision, the symbolic meaning of each section of the ritual. The film was made for instructional purposes; it fulfills these purposes in a highly intelligent manner. Gateway to Faith was produced at Sacred Heart Church, in Newark, N. J., and received the official imprimatur from Archbishop Thomas J. Walsh. The priest in the film is played with restraint and dignity by the Reverend John Wightman." Movie Makers, Dec. 1947, 537.


Girl With A Dress

Date produced: 1932

Filmmaker(s):

Clyde Hammond

Description:

"In his one reel film, Girl with a Dress, Clyde Hammond, ACL, has made an appealing and remarkably successful attempt to portray a drama of the spirit rather than of action. Through long weeks of bitter economy a girl accumulates enough money for a new dress. It arrives from the mail order house just in time for a summer's picnic with her friends and, happy in prospect, she wears it proudly. Then, because in it she is more charming than they, her friends will not like it, make mocking fun of her and she leaves them in tears. Stumbling home, she is caught in a shower and the dress is ruined. A simple enough tale, but in its very simplicity and sincerity lie the strength of downright tragedy. It was planned and directed with imagination and played, in its leading role, with definite and sensitive skill." Movie Makers, Dec. 1932, 562.


Give Her My Love

Date produced: 1968

Filmmaker(s):

Jeff Blyth

Description:

"Give Her My Love is a film in black-and-white made by a student of cinematography. It is a story of young love and the strange turn that young love can take. Jeff Blyth's handling of the story made the film a strong contender for the Scenario Award. A shy boy's life in an office and his second-hand love for a girl are well portrayed as a triangle develops and then becomes a zero" PSA Journal, Oct. 1968, 49.


Give Us This Day

Date produced: 1950

Filmmaker(s):

Alfred T. Bartlett

Description:

"Going back to The Lord's Prayer for the title of his picture, A. T. Bartlett has produced a handsome, heart-warming and technically able documentary on the theme "Our Daily Bread." In it one follows the staff of life from the vast and golden wheat fields of Australia, through the harvesting and milling of the grain, into the baker's hands and onto my lady's table. Give Us This Day is intelligently planned, smoothly developed and suavely executed. A simple but satisfying narrative continually relates the subject — as it should be — directly to human needs, and a pleasant musical score rounds out the presentation. Especially to be commended is the minimum of footage used by Mr. Bartlett in reporting on this age-old activity of mankind." Movie Makers, Dec. 1952, 339.


Total Pages: 23